Feasts of the Lord- Pentecost: The Introduction.

We are finally on the second feast. Today’s session is going to be really short and sweet.

Now let me remind you that Israel celebrates three main feasts. These feasts are not the feasts of Israel. They are the Feasts of our God, Yahweh.

These three feasts are:

Feast of Unleavened Bread (of which Passover and Wave Sheaf Offering/ first fruits are part)

✅ Feasts of Weeks or Harvest – Pentecost


✅ Feasts of Ingathering – Tabernacles

What is the Feast of Weeks?
Let’s hear what the LORD says about it:

You shall work six days, but on the seventh day you shall rest; even during plowing time and harvest you shall rest.

You shall celebrate the Feast of Weeks, that is, the first fruits of the wheat harvest, and the Feast of Ingathering at the turn of the year.

Exodus 34:21-22

Now the word “weeks” from the Hebrew actually means “sevens.”
The Feast can be called the Feast of Sevens Because seven days make a week.

This feast is important when counted from the Wave Sheaf Offering (first fruits). After that day you have to count a week of weeks or a seven of sevens.

This means seven weeks (49 days).


On the next day after the count, the feast begins.

“ From the day after the Sabbath, the day you brought the sheaf of the wave offering, count off seven full weeks. Count off fifty days up to the day after the seventh Sabbath, and then present an offering of new grain to the Lord.”

Leviticus 23:15-16

Wave Sheaf Offeringcount 49 daysPentecost (next day)

Since that day is day 50… It’s why the Greek word “Pentecost” was named as the feast. Pentecost means “the fiftieth day”

This feast was celebrated by bringing two loaves of the finest wheat – first fruits, and offering them before the Lord along with prescribed animal sacrifices.

We will delve deeper in the next episode. So once again, here lies your introduction to what Pentecost is generally about.

See you soon!
Uche Okorie

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